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of the house of delegates of the american bar association, where it first met steve. this is a series of programs underwritten by the charles gesky family, which examines the constitution in the 21st century. this examines the balance between safety, security, and public order, and the protection of civil liberties and the integrity of the constitution on the other. tonight program will focus on threats to our american justice system caused by under-funding and indecisiveness. i would like to mention that the question answer portion of the program will be moderated by a professor geoffrey hazard, a distinguished professor of law at uc hastings. the professor is a leading expert in the field of civil procedure of legal ethics and is good at asking questions. it is my pleasure to introduce our very special guest, stephen zack, president of the american bar association. with nearly 400,000 members, it is the largest volunteer professional membership organization in the world. mr. zack is the first hispanic american to serve as the president and the second to be born abroad. he was only 1
and you know what yo have and then you can treat the with what you learned in the first half with steve and the goal of triage happens to be th motto of nert "do the most good for the most people" and if there is an earthquake right no and ceiling collapsed and 40 people in here, and if i'm the one rescuer coming to you and the first person is not breathing and no pulse, would you want me to stop and do cpr for this person before i reache you and what if there are 500 people behind that and do cpr and i just have to open an air way and all patients fall unde under -- and i'm going to use colors and green, walking wounded and anybody that walks. d for delayed or yellow meaning you're hurt but you're not hurt enough. you're not hurt but that no not that bad an. and d is dead. and dead is the easiest one to determine. and how do we determine whether someone is dead? they're not breathing, right an steve said that several times and how do we know someone is not breathing? we look, listen, and feel and open the air way and we look to see if the chest is rising and listen to feel air and how
lived out by his gisat-grandson steve hearst. the now 80,000-acre hearst ranch is one of the largest and oldest working cattle ranches on the california coast. but when the new generation of hearsts took over, the question quickly became, how can the ranch keep thriving in the modern era? >> and it was my ranch manager cliff garrison who said, "gee, steve, it's a shame we couldn't do anything with our beef." and i said, "well, why couldn't we?" and so ultimately we started pursuing the grass-fed beef, and it fit right in with the whole conservation solution for the property. >> it's fun. it's a picnic every day. you know, we love it. it's a beautiful place and a great place to work. >> so from the shadow of their famous neighbor, the hearst ranch is stepping into the spotlight these days with their brand-few grass-fed beef operation. grazing on rolling hills with picturesque views, the hearst beef is billed as nothing being added but their history, and it's true. the cattle thrive on nutrient-rich native grasses that have been there since the days of william randolph hearst, and toda
? >> we were both -- we met in washington, d.c., when a steve martin -- in 2005 or to adults and six, he won the mark twain award -- it thousand five or 2006. there was a big show. i was one of the presenters. alan was a waiter. no. [laughter] no, alan was a writer. >> i helped larry david wright his speech. >> when we were far away from larry david, he says he wrote his speech. anyway, we like each other. we became friends and saw each other off and on over the next few years at conferences and stuff like that. alan kept saying -- >> we should do something together. >> i did not know what he meant. [laughter] he was very vague. he is kind of in the film-tv world, and people always say they want to do something. i said, ok, let's do something together. but i do not think we would. then he had this idea. >> his daughter played soccer. she was 11 years old. i had three children, all of whom spate -- played sports, little league, whatever. but he was 1,600 miles away from me. i was in new jersey. he was in florida. i can give you his home number later if you wish. [laughter] i said, listen,
steve with all of that versatile greenery is bay area legend armanino foods. in business since the 1920s when the family supplied fresh vegetables and herbs to the growing italian community in san francisco, they are now the leader in fresh-from-the-farm pesto, all thanks to a special recipe for success. >> recipe for pesto actually started with my grandmother, and we thought it was a great product, but no one knew about it. and so, we tried it @nd processed, brought it to the supermarket, and it started to work out. >> the armanino family says the first year, they sold only 1,000 or so cases. but now, they are shipping upwards of a million cases annually. and they attribute much of their success to their special connection to agriculture. >> a lot of people don't realize just about everything you eat today, you knop, originates on the farm. a lot of people don't even consider that or don't think about it. whether it's a cupcake or whether it's a hamburger, whether it's bread, everything starts on the farm. >> everything we eat does, indeed, start on the farm, including basil as the main
). [cheers and applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the cast of steve silver's beach blanket babylon. [cheers and applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the san francisco 49ers -- >> [inaudible] >> woo. >> laughter. come on. the san francisco giants. [cheers and applause] that's better. the detroit tigers. and that can only happen in the greatest city in the world, san francisco! [cheers and applause] >> "san francisco, open your golden gate". (music). [cheers and applause] "san francisco, when i get home again i'm coming home". [cheers and applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, please welcome giants' announcer renel brooks moon. >> what's up everybody? hello san francisco giants fans. [cheers and applause] how are you doing? this is so nice. we had to do it twice; right? thank you all for coming out today. and ladies and gentlemen it is my honor to welcome you to the official city celebration honoring your 2012 world series champions san francisco giants. now, as we gather together as a community today to celebrate this joyous occasion we do want to take a moment first to r
'll raise the temperature to the low sixties. we'll add some heat. >> and steve says they've steadily seen an increase in avocado consumption. on average, each american now consumes about 3 avocados per year. but steve thinks that will increase to 5 or 6 avocados within the next couple of years. so whether you try avocados in guacamole at your next party or try them to support farmers like the bruces, the time is indeed ripe to try some california avocados today. for "california country," i'm tracy sellers. >> brought to you by allied insurance, a member of the nationwide family of companies, which also includes nationwide insurance. on your side. >> today on food 101, we are talking about potatoes. and here to help us is greg corrigan, senior director of produce and floral here at raley's. all right, potato, pot-ah-to, whatever you call it. i don't know. >> you say potato, i say pot-ah-to. >> right. that's why we'll go to dinner tomorrow. but what do i need to know about picking out a good potato? >> well, there's--first of all, there's lots of choices when it comes to potatoes. >> ok. >>
in our state. steve mecher and thank you for being here. ongoing support. got the sf giants hat, yes. mike cureo and thanks for being here and the construction trades and we have been working with you to get the folks trained over the years. it's a wonderful time, and the chairman -- and the chairman of our san francisco metropolitan transportation agency who has been a long time champion of public transit, a regular muni rider, someone who loves the city and has been at the forefront of not only a great transportation but has his head in our city and programs and wonderful services. please come on up. chairman tom nolan. [applause] >> leader pelosi asked me what is of going to say after reverend frong. i didn't have a chant rate for that. this is a great day for san francisco. this is a labor of love. we know the economic and transit values of this. as an agency we are committed and not only committed to bringing this fruition on time but under budget as well. is that good? and we will continue the vil against of all of our assets and focusing on the priority number one is s
't agree more. [applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> good afternoon, steve mcdonald. chris and i have been friends since we pledged the fraternity at uc berkeley in 1978. i want to first thank chris's family for allowing me the honor of speaking today as we celebrate chris's amazing life. i look at this crowd. i try to figure out how much he achieved so much while making personal and
millionaires. it is the belief that you owe backe to a country that has helped to make you what you are. steve jobs -- we had a tough column in the last issue. it was tough not about apple labor practices in china. here you had a man of great wealth was talking about cutting taxes and never really gave of his philanthropic wealth. poor bill gates, he gets nailed for being so square. you can disagree with some things. but he is out there. >> all of them out there now came a little late to the party. they got very rich, very young. i wanted to leave some time for audience questions. i have not read more questions from the audience because they are also good. usually it is the guy with the aluminum hat on getting cia messages. [laughter] not really. if you want to line up, we have a few more minutes at the microphones. we will take a few questions. please make sure that you make them questions. >> i have been interested in americorps and other related programs. from what i can tell, you do not support it or talk about it very much. the tea party is advocating limiting national service. president
steve taber who is on spur. and i just think it's an excellent thing. it is the least impact to merchants. i'm a small business owner. i really respect that part of it. and i think it is a viable pagoda option. and i speak for a number of people. so, thank you for your work and i hope you do the [speaker not understood] thing. >> thank you so much. >> joan woods, the last person who turned in a speaker card. >> anyone else who cares to address the board, please bring up a card. good afternoon. >>> good afternoon, mr. nolan and those of you. i have lived in north beach for 48 years continuously. i was never notified of community meetings planning for the subway. eventually i was to friends of washington square to be part of a community advisory group to the subway. so, i've been attending those meetings for about four years. in the beginning mr. funge stated the plan was to rent the boring machines. he talked at a couple meetings about that. then somehow it became that the city was going to buy them. he never explained why they were going to change. and then more recently it h
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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